Tip of the Week: What is Deglazing?

Simply put, it adds flavor and makes clean up easier!

 

If you’ve read a recipe for a meaty stew or braise, you’ve probably come across the word “deglaze.” The word may seem a bit foreign to starter cooks, but it really is a simple process.

 

Deglazing is the process by which you add a liquid (often water, stock or wine) to a hot pan in order to help remove the bits and pieces left behind by something seared in the same pan, on a high heat. What deglazing does is, together with the heat of the pan, it moistens and loosens the browned remnants from the seared food (most often meats or proteins), making it easier to scrape it all off of the bottom of the pan.

 

Deglazing achieves two things:

1  It recaptures the lost bits and pieces left in the pan, therefore adding flavor to a sauce or stock and

 

2  It helps to instantly clean up the bottom of the pan without the need of constant scraping over the sink.

 

So, next time you see something that asks you to deglaze, don’t sweat it and grab that bottle of wine. Flavor awaits.

 

Image from pixabay.com

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