There is More To Philippine Cuisine Than Just Kinilaw, Adobo, and Sinigang

"Philippine cuisine is very complex," says Chef Tatung Sarthou.

 

 

"Philippine cuisine is very complex. It's more than just our kare-kare. It's more than just our kinilaw and sinigang, " says Chef Myke ‘Tatung’ Sarthou. Sarthou—whose culinary creations are showcased at his restaurant, Agos, in SM Mall of Asia—was the lone Filipino presenter in Madrid Fusion held in Madrid, Spain last January 2017. 

 

Sarthou talked about Mindanao cuisine and the Philippine sea salt. "The creativity and the innovation [of the region] comes from working with what is available.

 

This chicken is is marinated in a curry paste made from blackened coconut.

 

He continues, "One of the most striking recipes in Mindanao cuisine was the burnt coconut, this technique of cooking the coconut which burns it into a charcoal black to make some sort of flavoring agent for some dishes. It's called pamapa itum.

 

"It's very interesting because you expect it to be bitter but it's not at all. It has a slight caramel, toasted coconut and a certain type of sweetness which is very complex." 

 

More from Yummy.ph
Here are a few behind-the-scenes snaps of Spain's Madrid Fusion 2017.

This spicy beef stew is comfort food at its finest!

 

He continues, "[Philippine cuisine is] really creating and raising a culture. It's eating with a sense of understanding and respecting what the land has." 

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